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March 6, 2019

“Autism & Me: Meet Milan”

When their son, Milan, was officially diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) at seven years of age, his parents felt a wide range of emotions. Years of uncertainty and concern suddenly collided with feelings of optimism and hope, leaving the Connecticut couple in a state of limbo.

On one hand, they were ready to turn the page on a chapter of their lives that often left them wondering why their extremely smart, funny, empathetic child would suddenly transform into a rigid, aggressive, anxiety-stricken stranger in seemingly routine circumstances. A time when moments of concern and confusion would creep into their minds as they increasingly noticed developmental differences between Milan and his twin sister, Livi. Why did Milan have such sensitivity to loud noises and a heightened sense of smell? Why didn’t he like to be shown physical affection? Why was it so difficult for him to sit still for longer than a few minutes? And why didn’t Livi seem to be affected by any of these things?

On the other hand, they finally had an official diagnosis from Connecticut Children’s Medical Center, a trusted resource. But they were suddenly being thrust into a world about which they knew very little. One thing was certain: They would meet the news head-on and exhaust every resource to ensure their son would have everything he needed to live a happy, fulfilling life.

“My husband and I researched autism spectrum disorder and ADHD, spoke to Milan’s therapist and developmental pediatrician to develop a plan to deal with his diagnosis as a family. We reached out to other parents and the school social worker as well. Of course, Autism Speaks and SEPTO (Special Education Parent Teacher Organization) were also very helpful,” said Milan’s mom.

“We agreed that it would be best to share the diagnosis with Milan and his twin sister, who doesn’t have autism, to help them understand what the diagnosis meant. We read and discussed children’s books with them on ASD and researched autism heroes. We also shared the diagnosis with our friends and family and explained Milan’s sensitivities and needs.”

Today, with the help of an Individualized Education Program (IEP), a dedicated team of teachers and paraprofessionals, and trusted medical professionals, Milan continues to make tremendous strides both socially and academically. He was also placed on medication to help with his anxiety, which has allowed him to become more relaxed around his peers and use his coping strategies to overcome any difficulties he may face throughout the day. Milan has come so far since his initial diagnosis two years ago that today he’s the proud co-author and illustrator of a children’s book titled, “Autism & Me.”

The paperback, co-authored by Allison Butler, Milan’s former paraprofessional and close family friend, is based on Milan’s life. It tells the story of a fictional character, Mike, and creatively demonstrates how his mind works differently than those of most of his friends and family members because he has autism. Milan not only did all the illustrations in the book, but he provided valuable insight into his daily triumphs and struggles in hopes of providing a better understanding about what it means to be on the autism spectrum.

“I had Milan draw all the pictures in the book because a lot of kids in school looked up to his drawings. They would ask how he drew something a certain way or if he could teach them how to draw. To get him even more into the book, I thought it would be nice if the book were about him,” Allison said with a huge smile. “There aren’t many children’s books out there that are from the perspective of a student with autism. This book really came from Milan’s perspective, how he thinks and what he thinks about his struggles and his strengths. I’m just so proud he was able to share his story with the world.”

In the final page of the book, Milan proudly describes the positive outlook he has adopted about his autism since being diagnosed two years ago.

“When I think of autism I think of a big lightbulb on the top of my head. I do not want people to feel bad for me. I like having autism and I would never change anything about myself,” he said through the voice of Mike. “I would not be the person I am today if I did not have autism. I am very creative and smart because of this. However, autism is just a little part of me; it is not who I am.”

Need personalized support? Autism Speaks Autism Response Team (ART) is an information line for the autism community, staffed by a specially trained team who provide personalized information and resources to people with autism and their families. AutismSpeaks.org also offers a variety of resources, tool kits and information on autism services and supports in communities around the country.

1-888-AUTISM2 (1-888-288-4762) 

En Español: 1-888-772-9050

familyservices@autismspeaks.org

March 4, 2019

4 Student Athlete Character Builders & Busters

By Merilee Kern, MBA

At a time when sports, coaching and even athlete parenting have become a never-ending chase for profit, popularity and prominence, it can be difficult, and sometimes seemingly impossible, to cultivate character and integrity in student athletes—whether they be NCAA-level, high school or even middle school age players.

Just one quick Google search can reveal the extent to which honor and any notable “code of ethics” in student sports is suffering amid a pervasive glut of incidents from coast to coast involving cheating, abuse, and other forms of misconduct. One particularly high-profile example underscoring how insidious the problem is the FBI investigation revealing that head and assistant coaches were using NCAA monetary profits for bribery gain. This resulted in a mass arrest of head coaches, assistant coaches, and staff members. While this traumatic event changed NCAA college basketball practices interminably for the better, in the process the NCAA board suffered extreme embarrassment and strife from the fraudulent exposure while coaches and other staffers suffered irreparable career damage—not to mention the “collateral damage” to players, their families and the university’s, themselves.

Given what seems to be an endless array of scandals, there is a beacon of light in the form of Coach Gary Waters, a former Kent State, Rutgers, and Cleveland State Head Coach. As one of the nation’s preeminent Character Coaches, Waters urges that parents, coaches, team leaders and anyone engaging with student athletes should establish—and wholeheartedly assure adherence to—a defined set of principles that have the express intention of bolstering a student athlete’s character, values, and philosophies both on and off the court. “Character is defined by moral excellence and firmness,” says Coach Waters. “When a person’s principles, ethics, integrity and even spirituality are aligned, staying in the guidelines for the law and regulation comes effortlessly, like a second nature.”

Today more than ever, student athlete coaches and programs are instilling the importance of honor, valor and integrity, and parents at home are eager to follow suit. With this in mind, Coach Waters offers these fundamental basics on what a sports-driven student should do—and not to do—as they endeavor to build character:

***Character Builders – DO This:

 

Work Hard At What Matters...Fearlessly:

Coach Waters believes, and one can nary disagree, that the effort one puts forth directly correlates with the outcome of what one pursues, and that a great number of those “sweat equity” efforts should be proactively focused on endeavors that further life goals—be those related to athletics, career, relationships, family dynamics, spirituality or other areas of self-improvement and personal growth. Modern-day life is filled with a glut of complexities that can make it difficult to “see the forest through the trees” and aptly discern exactly what matters most in achieving various goals, and prioritizing in kind. It can actually be overwhelming—especially when the goals ahead seem insurmountable or entirely unreachable.

Time is finite and there’s only so much of it to be had each day, so Coach Waters underscores the importance of allocating dedicated and concerted time on the most meaningful and impactful areas needing attention—those that will yield short term results, but will also be mindful of longer-term objectives. As importantly, Waters also advocates “attacking” one’s goals fearlessly so as to counteract self-doubt, uncertainty, hesitation and other detrimental inner dialogue that can present obstacles and swiftly thwart one’s best hopes and intentions. It’s been said that FEAR stands for “Forget Everything And Run” and, according to Eldonna Lewis-Fernandez, author of “Think Like a Negotiator,” fear is “that uncomfortable, disconcerting feeling that causes us to take a back seat in our own life and prevents us from proactively moving forward to reach our goals and aspirations. Instead of facing a personal, business or workplace situation head on and taking control of the proverbial handlebars of life, fear causes us to turn the other way, freeze in our tracks, or poke our head in the sand.”

According to Lewis-Fernandez, fear of failure can be particularly debilitating. “All too often we stop short of attempting something new for fear we might embarrass our self or, worse, fail all together,” she says. “Any given undertaking has the possibility of resulting in failure, which is never a desirable or welcome outcome.  But, when facing something new, a fear of failure can be amplified as anxiety or nerves, and our ‘fight or flight’ instinct kicks in.  These intense feelings can cause us to put our aspirations on the shelf where they can languish in perpetuity.”  She also cites fear of vulnerability as another area of concern.  “While it can be uncomfortable and downright scary to open yourself up and expose your true inner self and your ideas and aspirations to others of importance in your life, doing so can be cathartic - and a true turning point in effecting positive change,” Lewis-Fernandez notes. “Letting down your guard takes courage and strength, and allowing yourself to be vulnerable can help you better relate with people on a more personal level.”

 

Value And Demonstrate Loyalty:

Loyalty means different things to different people. For Coach Waters, loyalty is about the commitment one makes to a cause, a particular group or specific persons. It involves a feeling of devotion or obligation to someone or something in both good times and bad. Other definitions describe loyalty as involving faithfulness to something or someone to which one is bound by pledge or duty. In all instances, however, loyalty is about integrity—keeping one’s word or upholding expectations of another as demonstrated through one’s actions, optimally in a sustained and habitual manner. Coach Waters believes that ingraining a sense of loyalty in student athletes certainly begins at home, but extends far to other role models—whether they are intentional or incidental. This includes coaches, administrators, teachers and even other players.

To understand the extent to which one is demonstrating loyalty in their everyday lives, Coach Waters recommends an easy exercise to determine one’s “loyalty score” relating to various endeavors. He suggests doing a self-analysis rating one’s self in relation to a given venture (like loyalty to one’s team or sport at large). On a scale of one to five, ratings can be related to key tenants of loyalty like honesty, trustworthiness, support, generosity, commitment, reliability sincerity, consistency and partiality. Assessing one’s commitment to a specific endeavor with these attributes in mind can be a powerful tool in determining if a better effort needs to be made...and in which areas. Even caregivers, coaches and others can use this tool to rate the student athlete, and then use it as a springboard for discussion that can manifest in a powerful dialogue—a tactical growth moment for all involved.

 

***Character Busters – DON’T do This:

 

Demonstrate Undependability

Coach Waters concedes that, amid stressful schedules and demands on a player’s time and resources, remaining dependable and steadfast can be difficult. Worse, he feels there is lessening value being placed on these attributes despite the fact that they can play a critical role in one’s success trajectory. He also feels that all too these traits are being cultivated as it relates to the game itself, but not carried over into other facets of the player’s life and value system overall.  “Success in the classroom and growth in the player’s personal development often isn’t valued, and parents and coaches often aren’t supported in their efforts to help players grow as people...only as players,” he laments. Worse, role models and mentors like coaches themselves often set examples of disloyalty, by foregoing a commitment to their institution in favor of money and acclaim elsewhere.

For a student athlete, they have many ways that they can demonstrate their dependability each day, week and month—both within and outside of their sport. And, Waters suggests proffering rewards for them doing so. Relating to athletics, this can include making a staunch commitment making it to every practice (and on time and fully prepared); being “present” at practice by being fully engaged in the lesson or drill at hand; and being known as someone known for “going the extra mile” to help out other players when needed—whether that’s understanding a play or providing emotional support when things aren’t going well. Outside of sports, dependability can be shown in areas like turning in complete homework on time, every time; being where you say you’ll be at the stated time; handling responsibilities at home like chores in a self-directed manner without need for prompting or reminding; and being willing to “lend a helping hand” or a “supportive ear” when someone is in distress. Doing any of this involves an outward point-of-view and nurturing an altruistic spirit. 

 

Undermine Authority

According to Waters, “Having a reverence for authority, as demonstrated by overtly respectful treatment and regard, is a mission-critical aspect of character building. Respectful behaviors and attitudes should certainly start in the home with parents, but needs to carry over to all others in a student athlete’s life: relatives, coaches, administrators, teammates, referees, friends and even strangers like the elderly. When a fundamental respect for authority doesn’t exist, it becomes a slippery slope that can lead to contentious relationships in every direction, missed opportunities or, in worst case scenarios upon festering longer-term, full expulsion from the team.” This scenario is made far worse when a disrespectful player actually undermines authority at large, such that their actions are making others lose respect for the authority figure(s) as well, he notes.

This is an insidious situation Waters knows can have a grave effect on a sports program in short order, “corroding the foundational value system needed to have a productive and winning mentality.”

In kind, it’s imperative that student athletes are diverted from this behavior, being redirected to engage in more productive ways. But, what does “undermining authority” look like when not in the form of public back talk, snickering and general rudeness? Rest assured that undermining authority does not always involve obvious discourtesy, but rather can be quite clandestine.  According to Waters, there are some less obvious signs a student athlete may be undermining authority—or anyone for that matter—and need to be course-corrected as part of their character building effort. One red flag he points out is when someone consistently prompts others to defend their opinion, assertion or point-of-view. Those who undermine authority also often dole out “backhanded compliments” that actually serve to reference or highlight a negative aspect of a situation in a counterpoint contrast to the positive. A third thing to watch out for according to Waters is subversive advice packaged as being helpful, like an alternate plan purported to be advantageous for the authority figure (or group at large) when, in fact, more selfish motives and benefits are at hand. Knowing what to look for is key for helping student athletes avoid this kind of surreptitious or even inadvertent self-destructive behavior.

 

For coaches, parents and other ‘key influencers,’ it’s imperative to not only push physical development of a student athlete but also instill a reverence for character development founded on a stated and shared value and belief system—a critical facet of their personal growth and development and one entirely under their span of control. Student advisors must also lead by example and walk the walk, making being principle and ideology-driven a cyclical endeavor without hypocrisy. Only then can the student, team, family, game, school, program and industry at large be elevated, allowing everyone to reach their full potential.

As John Wooden famously said about coaches, “Be more concerned with your character than your reputation, because your character is what you are, while your reputation is merely what others think you are.”

Branding, business and entrepreneurship success pundit, Merilee Kern, MBA, is an influential media voice and lauded communications strategist. As the Executive Editor and Producer of "The Luxe List International News Syndicate,” she’s a revered trends expert and industry voice of authority who spotlights noteworthy marketplace change makers, movers, shakers and tastemakers. Merilee may be reached online at www.TheLuxeList.com, on Twitter at www.Twitter.com/LuxeListEditor, on Facebook at www.Facebook.com/TheLuxeList and on Instagram at www.Instagram.com/LuxeListReviews.

 

 

January 23, 2019

Ten Questions to Ask to Make Your Child’s IEP Meeting a Success

Ten Questions to Ask to Make Your Child's IEP Meeting a Success
Episcopal Center for Children Offers Advice to Help Parents of Children Coping with Special Needs


Individualized Education Plan (IEP) meetings are very important for children coping with special needs. These meetings outline goals for the child's education and treatment, and it guides how services will be provided. "These meetings are very important because the IEP guides how the child will be educated and outlines goals for the child, interventions, and any accommodations and services that will be provided," said Dodd White, president and CEO of the Episcopal Center for Children (ECC), a nonprofit organization providing therapeutic and special education services to children ages 5-14 in the greater Washington, DC area. "It's important to review IEP meeting documents in advance before the meeting," said White. "An IEP meeting brings together the entire IEP team assisting your child – educators, treatment providers, parents, the Local Education Agency (LEA) representative and others. Parents and guardians are an important part of that team. You are there to be an advocate for your child," said White. It's important for parents and guardians to ask the right questions before, during and after an IEP meeting. Here are some questions to help:

Question #1: When is the IEP meeting and how will I participate? At least 10 days before the IEP meeting, you should receive a letter of invitation. As soon as you can, RSVP for the meeting in writing. Inform the school if you will attend the meeting in person or by phone. If you are not available to attend the meeting at the proposed time, suggest alternative dates and times, as well as locations.

Question #2: What documents will be discussed at the IEP meeting? At least 5 business days before the IEP meeting, you should receive draft documents. These may include the IEP, a behavior intervention plan (BIP), or evaluations of your child. Review these documents carefully before the meeting.

Question #3: Does this plan address my child's education and treatment needs? Are the goals and objectives clear? Before the meeting, carefully review draft documents and write down your questions and notes. Review the diagnosis and examine the plan carefully to see how it addresses your child's needs. Ask for clarification of education or treatment jargon if needed. Goals and objectives should be clear in the plan.

Question #4: When will services be offered? Make sure you understand start date(s), how long services are offered, and the procedures involved. Determine how frequently services are offered.

Question #5: Is my child progressing toward a goal in the plan? And will the plan help my child progress? If your child is not progressing toward a goal as you had hoped, ask how this will be addressed, or if a goal should be revised.

Question #6: When will I be updated on my child's progress? The plan should indicate when you will be updated. If you want more frequent updates on progress during the school year, you can request additional updates be added to the plan for you.

Question #7: What else can be done to assist my child? If you think something else might help your child, come prepared to discuss it. Write down any proposed changes to the IEP and any information you would like to add.

Question #8: Should anyone else attend the meeting? Invite additional people to the IEP meeting if you want them there and think they can contribute. An IEP meeting takes a "team" approach to helping your child. Take the initiative to invite individuals who have relevant knowledge or expertise regarding your child (such as, family members, coaches, community support workers, social workers, attorneys, advocates, etc.). Let the school team know additional people will attend the meeting.

Question #9: How can I have a healthy working relationship with the school, treatment providers, and the entire IEP team? Developing healthy and professional relationships with the school and treatment providers can help your child. Be open to discussing issues promptly, directly, honestly and courteously. Ask questions and listen carefully to answers. This will allow you to respond appropriately and avoid misunderstandings.

Question #10: How can I support my child at home? Ask what you can do at home to support and reinforce what your child is learning at school. Realize that home also needs to be a place of respite – a place to recover from the hard work that may have occurred at school.
About the Episcopal Center for Children

The Episcopal Center for Children (Center) is a nonprofit, nondenominational school and treatment program for children contending with emotional challenges from the greater Washington, D.C. metropolitan area. Accredited by the Joint Commission, the Center serves children who are 5-14 years old in grades K-8. The goal of the Center's treatment, therapeutic milieu, and individualized special education program is to empower each child to function productively within his or her family and community. Building on strengths within children, the Center partners with families in treatment and focuses on enabling its students to access and become their best possible selves. More information is available at eccofdc.org and on Twitter and Facebook @ECCofDC.

January 7, 2019

Circle Home World’s first custom monitoring system to protect your family on the Internet and keep the tech in check

Circle Home


World's first custom monitoring system to protect your family on the Internet and keep the tech in check


• Device pairs wirelessly with home network and instantly detects devices paired with local Wi-Fi network including: smart phones, gaming systems, laptops, tablets, smart TVs, etc.
• The companion app gives parents full control over which content is viewed and the time spent on each device
• Through the dashboard, parents can create unique profiles for each family member with specific parental control settings such as:
1. Time Limits – Allows for complete control of screen time usage between a variety of apps, platforms and web-based programs
2. Bedtime™ – Automatically disconnects and reconnects devices from Wi-Fi at scheduled times
3. Filter – Set individual age and interest filters for each family member
4. Pause – Ability to turn off and turn on network Wi-Fi at any time
• Circle Go extends all of the features and functionality of Circle in the home to any network (wireless or cellular) to outside the home
• Circle Connections Platform integrates with the latest services like Alexa, IFTTT and FamilyTech apps to reward kids with additional screen time
• Intuitive insights allow parents to track and compare online usage from week to week, month to month, per site, by interest or category
• Simplistic design means Circle seamlessly blends into any home aesthetic

Available at: meetcircle.com, Amazon.com
Price: $99; Circle Go: $4.95/month for up to 10 devices
Website: www.meetcircle.com

December 18, 2018

Aj Collections

Women, especially Moms, love personalized gifts and many of them love jewelry too! The AJ's Collection line of beautifully hand finished, sterling silver necklaces and charms will fulfill both desires for the ladies in your life.


Each charm they offer can be customized with the names of loved ones, or even the recipient's own name. Choose from more than 100 different charm patterns and designs that are sure to touch the heart of the woman who receives them. Swarovski birthstones can be added as well. These unique necklaces are made in the USA with quick turnaround and delivery.

The perfect customized gift for Moms, Grandmas and women of all walks of life can be found at www.ajscollection.com

December 17, 2018

Sonic Mania Plus

Sonic Mania Plus


Sonic Mania Plus continues the thrilling journey of the critically-acclaimed platformer, Sonic Mania. Jump back into the game with two iconic new playable characters, Mighty the Armadillo and Ray the Flying Squirrel, and a new Encore mode that provides a fresh look to familiar zones with new challenges and layouts. Fans can purchase the all-new physical edition on PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and Nintendo Switch at participating retailers for $29.99. For more information, visit www.sonicthehedgehog.com.

December 14, 2018

Barista Bar

With Creative Café Barista Bar, kids will enjoy becoming a barista at home and creating their own kid-friendly "lattes" made with frothed milk. Inspired by current coffee culture and kids' desire to be like mom or dad, the Creative Café Barista Bar is kid safe and works without heat. (There's even a name for this kind of latte – Google babyccino!)

Kids froth and flavor real or nut/soy milks to create drink combinations like mock-iato or a Neapolitan latte. Once milk is prepared, kids can decorate beverages with chocolate or strawberry mix and stencils.

Kits include frothing unit, frothing pitcher, stencils, shaker bottles (for sprinkles), spoons, cups strawberry and chocolate flavor packets and recipe cards to get started (SRP $29.99, Age: 6+).

Cups of frothed milk adorned with powered chocolate hearts or sprinkles are perfect for any mini-me and make a stand-out gift that kids will use again and again.

November 26, 2018

Banana Phone

Leave the seriousness behind with a Banana Phone – the phone with appeal! This banana-shaped, Bluetooth®-enabled, mobile handset connects to your smartphone and lets you talk to your loved ones on a banana!
Pair your Banana Phone with your smartphone via Bluetooth and start receiving or initiating calls via Siri or OK Google.

The Banana Phone is the perfect gift for anyone on your gift list because not only is it hilarious, it also supports a great cause as well! Banana Phone donates 1% of all revenue to support Gorilla Conservation in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. They partner with Gearing Up For Gorillas and are certified by 1% For The Planet.

Name: Banana Phone
Price: $39.99
URL: https://bananaphone.io

October 31, 2018

Engineers Change the World! And That's Just One Reason to be One

10 ways to encourage your daughter to be an Amy in a world of Pennys


Industrial engineer Paula Jensen vividly remembers the day her youngest daughter told her that building block toys were for boys, not girls.
"And her mother's an engineer," says Jensen, an industrial engineering lecturer at the South Dakota School of Mines & Technology in Rapid City, SD.
Despite a nationwide push to encourage more women to enter the science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) fields, there remains a lag.
The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reports that technology professions will see the greatest growth from now to the year 2030. Yet girls are still not pursuing the STEM fields in adequate numbers. And it's not because women can't do it. Studies show that girls score just as high or higher in math and science as their male counterparts, yet there remains a confidence gap – girls tend to believe that boys are better at science and math regardless of test scores.


What can parents do to encourage their daughters to remain open to careers in STEM fields? Here are 10 tips from the female scientists, engineers and staff at SD Mines.


1. Give your daughter toys that build spatial learning, an important skill in engineering fields - toys like tinker kits, Legos and builder kits. Studies show that girls tend to have less spatial skills than boys because of the toys they are given as children, says Jensen. The good news is spatial skills are easily learned, so make sure your daughters are building and creating. When Jensen's daughter told her building toys were for boys, she began to make a more conscious effort to give her toys that build spatial learning. Today, her daughter attends science-related camps and has a real interest in STEM.

2. Invite questions. Listen for those questions that show interest in the world, such as "Why is the sky blue?" and "What makes soda fizz?" And then answer the questions. If you don't know, together with your daughter find out. Make it fun.

3. Find mentors for your daughters. Do you know a female engineer or doctor or scientist? Make sure your daughter knows them, too. If you don't know any, find those examples in popular culture – books, television, movies, etc.

4. Don't be afraid to get involved with their schooling. For instance, if you know your child's school has one extraordinary physics teacher, go to bat to make sure your daughter gets that teacher.

5. Remind your daughter that it's OK not to have an A in everything. Inventors and scientists learn by trial and error. Mistakes sometimes lead to great things.

6. Find the science in everyday play. Does your daughter like to dig in the dirt and discover new rocks? Make the connection that this is a type of science and Google some fun stories about what geologists do. While making supper or baking cookies, talk about how there's a science behind the food cooking and yeast rising. If she figures out a solution to a problem, praise that she naturally used the scientific process, guessing and testing to figure it out. Attaching engineering and scientific terms to what they are already doing will help those labels continue to feel natural as they grow older, says Sarah Folsland with the Women in Science and Engineering (WISE) center at SD Mines.

7. If your daughter is especially "girly," make the science fit her spirit. A science princess is good at making beautiful glitter slime and uses chemistry to make it extra gooey and sparkly. Keep in mind that even parents can have biases of what a science experiment should look like. Identify those tendencies and get creative with your approach to make science and engineering appealing to your child's interests.

8. Take advantage of classes and camps. For instance, the National Security Agency (NSA) offers a free cyber security camp for girls. Even if your daughter has no experience in programming, these kinds of experiences could open her eyes to a career in computer science and coding.

9. Get your daughter's friends involved by creating a STEM club. Go on a nature hike and identify plants and birds. Look for science and engineering companies in your community and ask for a tour. Host a science-themed birthday party or conduct a science experiment in your kitchen when your daughter has friends visiting. There are tons of ideas online.

10. Be conscious of your own biases. You might not have fond memories of math and science classes, but be careful about how you describe your experiences and feelings about the subjects, says engineer Andrea Brickey, an associate professor of mining engineering and management at SD Mines. If your daughter is asking for help with her math or science homework and you don't feel you can assist, reach out to the teacher and see if there are tutors or older students who can help. There are also some great resources online to help brush up on your skills. Search for "Khan Academy" or "Just Math Tutorials" and have some fun, she says.

About SD Mines
Founded in 1885, the South Dakota School of Mines & Technology is a science and engineering research university located in Rapid City, S.D., offering bachelor's, master's and doctoral degrees. The university enrolls 2,778 students with a student-to-faculty ratio of 15:1. The SD School of Mines placement rate for graduates is 97 percent, with an average starting salary of more than $61,300. Find us online at www.sdsmt.edu and on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Instagram and Snapchat.

September 12, 2018

Saucony, Keds, Sperry shoes for back to school

As the school year is quickly coming to a close, the search for the perfect summer camp shoe is on! Finding a shoe that's tough like a sneaker, yet breathable like a sandal can be tough, but Merrell's Hydro 2.0 makes it simple.

The Hydro 2.0 takes kids' performance sandals to the next level. With easy on/off adjustability and a durable outsole paired with cutouts and mesh details, the sneaker goes from land to sea seamlessly.

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